What is the purpose of college?

             “Go to school, get an education, get a job,” this is the phrase I heard from my parents since the day I was born. College has always been a part of my life, it was never an option. College was always viewed as a stepping stone in life, the stone that follows high school and comes before having a real adult job. However, it was not until this project that I was challenged with figuring out what the purpose of college really is. I had never thought twice about what the purpose of college was. The purpose of college was to get a well paying job. But is that really the only reason that there are so many universities all over the world? Just to help students get a job when all is said and done. I have realized that the purpose of college for me and many other students is to obtain the knowledge for a career upon graduating and also to help one grow as a person along the way. Universities tell you in the mission statements that the purpose of college is to gain knowledge and also to grow as a person. Parents push the idea that college is a place to gain an education to then get a job and also to grow as a person. While these three different groups of people all seem to have different views of what college is for, there is one similarity. College is a place to grow as a person.

             Sarah Borchardt is a freshman at DePaul University this year. She came into college with the thought that college is a place to learn so you can then get a job but just as importantly, college is a place to grow as a person.  Sarah grew up with the notion that there was no other option but college after high school, much like myself. She also came into college without much of a plan as to what she wanted to major in and with absolutely no clue of what she wanted to do after college. Sarah states, “I did not know what the hell I wanted to do once I got to college; I knew that there would be parties and fun stuff. I did not even pick a college until my parents forced me to choose the day before the deadlines and I chose the “enie menie minie mo” method. I’m happy with my choice though” (Sarah Borchardt, May 25, 2010, personal interview).  For Sarah, growing as a person was more of the purpose of going to college than to get a career; however, she knew that without college she would not be able to obtain a career with the professional standing she wanted.

            Most students begin looking at college’s junior year of high school and decide on a college by the end of senior year. I decided on my college freshman year of high school.  Of course I had already decided on my future career by this point as well.  In September of my senior year I applied to DePaul University, planning to major in Psychology for the purpose of one day becoming a therapist.  I put all my eggs into one basket praying that all the hard work I had done my four years of high school would get me into my dream school. In November, I received my letter of acceptance and by the end of the week I had sent in the housing deposit.  At this point I began looking at graduate schools. Most seniors in high school do not even think about what they want to major in when they get to college and here I was looking at graduate schools. I knew what career I wanted and I knew exactly how to get where I wanted to go. I never thought to stop and think that college might be something more than a place to gain an education to then go out and obtain a career. I knew there would be fun times and lifelong friends that are made along the way but I never understood why they called college “the best four years of your life.” To me, college was strictly the four years separating you and the working adult life. Well I am glad I came to college. I have gained knowledge that will help me with my career so far in my first year but more importantly, I have realized how much I have grown as an individual; more than the knowledge I gained.

                 Parents have a different outlook on what the purpose of college is for.  Eran Frankel,  a mom who wrote in to The New York Times regarding an article entitled “Plan B: Skip College” said, “My daughter is graduating from high school this month and going to college in the fall. The prospects are slim that she will find meaningful work with a B.A. in any field. But what we’re expecting of her time in college is that she will become a sufficiently skilled world citizen to be able to make successful future decisions about her life,” (nytimes.com). This mom reflects how many parents now days in this economy view college. It is expected that parents realize what this economy means for their children going to college. The National Association of Colleges and Employers’ Job Outlook 2010 report shows employers plan to hire 5.3 percent more new college graduates in 2009-10 than they did in 2008-09. This statistic may look promising, but it is important to realize that the numbers for employers hiring new college graduates was down 22 percent in 2009 than in 2008 (Lang, K J,). The job market is going back up but it is not going quickly enough that when college freshman now graduate in three years they will be promised a job.  So then we are forced to view college in another way that is separate from the career aspect because many of us going to college might not end up with a job when we graduate.

              However, it is important to realize what the basis of college is, education. I sat down with my own father, Chris Griffin, to ask him what he believed the purpose of college is for.  My father attended college for two year and then dropped out to begin working. Years later he created Garland Griffin Homes, a home building company, along with his business partner.  He had to educate himself on everything it took to not only run a successful business, but how to build homes and all the laws and rules that come along with building homes.“The purpose of college is to get an education to then go on to have a career. You can get a career without going to college but somewhere along the line you are still going to have to get that education a job requires and college offers. College is a place where you can more handily get the education you need for a career. It is not to say that without college you cannot have a successful career, I’m a perfect example of that, it is just easier to get that education from college than to get that education on your own,” (Chris Griffin, May 21, 2010, Personal Interview).

               Colleges have their own view on what they are there for. DePaul University’s Visiontwenty12 is their latest campaign in bettering the university in which they hope will lead to “preparing women and men to be at the forefront of their chosen fields as ethical and socially engaged leaders,” (Catholic Identity). Other universities like Harvard University “strives to create knowledge, to open the minds of students to that knowledge, and to enable students to take best advantage of their educational opportunities” (Mission Statement -Harvard University). Columbia University, “Expects all areas of the university to advance knowledge and learning at the highest level and to convey the products of its efforts to the world,” (Columbia University: About Columbia). One thing that is similar among these three universities that is much like the rest of the universities around the country is that they want their students to gain knowledge and grow as a person from that knowledge. They want their students to go on and be the best citizens that they possibly can.

               The purpose of college is to gain an education, hopefully a job, and to grow as an individual; this all makes sense to me. However, I cannot help but wonder about the exceptions. What about those people who do not go to college and end up working at McDonalds for the rest of their lives? What about the men and women who forgo college to fight for something bigger than themselves, in wars across seas?  And what about those students who go to college but live at home? Are we saying that all these people do not grow as individuals because they did not go to college? It is obvious that these people still grow as individuals; it just may not happen the same way that it happens to college students.

           Dr. Max Kaplan, a man whose teaching career spanned over 43 years said, “The immense variety of environments in which academic lives it purposes… Of course, the academic is not an abstract, but a community of students and scholars in the flesh. They share a general vision of society, of life in general and of themselves” (Kaplan 9). Regardless of what you may believe college is for, there is no denying that college forces you to grow; as a member of society, in your own life in general and in yourself.

Bibliography 

“Catholic Identity.” DePaul :: Office of Mission and Values. Web. 31 May 2010. <http://mission.depaul.edu/twenty12/index.asp&gt;.

“Columbia University: About Columbia.” Columbia University in the City of New York. Web. 31 May 2010. <http://www.columbia.edu/about_columbia/mission.html&gt;.

Kaplan, Max. “The Campus and the World.” Preface. One Life: the Free Academic. Madison,   NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 1998. Print.

Lang, K J. “Job Outlook for College Grads Better, but Not Ideal | La Crosse Tribune Newspaper | Find Articles at BNET.” Find Articles at BNET | News Articles, Magazine Back Issues & Reference Articles on All Topics. 2 May 2010. Web. 31 May 2010. <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3652/is_20100502/ai_n53778269/?tag=content;col1&gt;.

“Letters – Roads to Success That Bypass College – NYTimes.com.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 21 May 2010. Web. 31 May 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/23/opinion/l23college.html?hpw&gt;.

“Mission Statement – Harvard University.” Harvard Home. Web. 31 May 2010. <http://www.harvard.edu/siteguide/faqs/faq110.php&gt;.

Advertisements

Add a comment June 1, 2010

Birth Order and Characteristics: A Research Paper

        Have you ever wondered what makes you different from someone? Have you ever wondered what makes you similar? I bet you have probably never tried to compare yourself with others based on birth order.  However, birth order can be very telling of someone’s personality.  Those who are only children or middle children may find themselves facing the “only child/ middle child syndrome” because of the common annoying characteristics behind being an only child or a middle child. While some people may believe that only middle children and only children face a “syndrome” this is not true; every person has a birth order that gives them unique characteristics. Birth Order exerts significantly greater influence on openness to experience, conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism and the propensity to rebel (Sulloway, 1996). I will be addressing the common characteristics that first born/only born, second born/middle born and last born children carry and why they have those characteristics.

        First born children have their own stereotypes, most of which are similar to only children. Since these children are the first born, they carry a lot of expectations on their shoulders. They are the first ones to lose a tooth, get their drivers license and graduate from high school; therefore these kids face a lot of expectations which should be a part in how their characteristics form. For example, first born children are characterized as children who thrive on listening to those of authority. Those in authority represent the source of approval and are often the voice for explicit rules (Hoopes Harper, 1987).  Some reports say that first born’s are jealous people because from the time they are born until the time another sibling is born, they have their parents undivided attention. However, once a sibling is born they have to then share their parent’s attention which some children can then resent and learn to be jealous.  First born children are also reported to be more self-confident than later-borns, and they are overrepresented among political leaders, including American presidents and British prime ministers (Sulloway, 1996). The reason the first born is typically more self-confident and tend to carry themselves the best way they can is because they want to portray their family in the best light. By them being self-confident and poised, they are trying to show that their family is also self-confident and poised; they believe they are a direct reflection of their family and it is up to them to protect their family’s image. First born children tend to be the most responsible because they feel it is their duty to protect the family when the parents cannot (Lamb Sutton-Smith, 1982)

         Distinguishing a Second born person is a little more difficult since they can be the second born in a line of eight kids or they can be second born in the line of three kids making them middle children. Second born children view their older sibling as the person to “dethrone” (Sulloway, 1996). They are in this constant race of catch up with their older sibling. Second born children also tend to be the most envious children (Herrera, Zajonc, Wieczorkowska, & Cichomski, 2003). When interviewed, Callyn Humm, the second born of four children described how she and her sister, the third born, felt left out in the family and often felt envious of the attention her oldest and youngest siblings get.  Callyn said, “My brother is the first born, he is the golden child who can do no wrong. My younger brother is the last born and he also is the one who can do no wrong. Whenever anything happens, my sister and I get the brunt of the responsibility for it” (Callyn Humm, personal communication, May 5, 2010). When you think about it, the fact that the middle child feels left out is logical. The first born is the parent’s first child so they will always have that special relationship with their parents. Much like this, the last born is the last child that the parents have so there is another special bond between the child and parents. The middle child(ren) do not have this special bond with their parents because they are in the middle, they are not the first or the last, just the middle.

          Last born children have characteristics that are the most individual. Last born children cannot be anything other than last born. Last born are characterized as the “wild” children. They are least likely to listen to authority and most likely to do their own thing (Sulloway,1996). This is because they are so far removed from their parents grasp of discipline since they were the last born and their parents have already gone through the discipline routine a few times, they see authority as a less important aspect of their life, the very opposite of the first born child. Last born children are also described as being the most talkative and outgoing (Herrera, Zajonc, Wieczorkowska, & Cichomski, 2003 ). This is because the last born child who has one or more older siblings has grown up with those siblings. Unlike first borns, when they arrive, it is not just them and their parents; it is them, their parents, and their siblings who are close in age to them. First borns have to learn on their own how to interact with children close in age, while last borns know no different than interacting with children close in age because they interact with their siblings right away. Tucker Murray is a last born child, with an older brother and sister. She agrees whole heartedly that she is the rebel out of both of her siblings; which follows the typical characteristic of the last born. She also agrees that both of her siblings fit into the characteristics described above. Her sister, the first born, is very responsible and has always followed her authorities. Her brother, the middle born, was described in so many words as envious (Tucker Murray, personal communication, May 6, 2010).  Like Tucker, I am a last born child. I find myself to be very outgoing and talkative and a little less likely to follow authority than my older sister. I also find my older sister to be very responsible and very intent on following authority.

         Now that you have seen a great deal of the different characteristics typical to a certain birth order, do you find that you fit in? Now of course the characteristics get a bit complex when going into step-, half-, or adopted siblings (Dunkel, Harbe,& Papini, 2009 ), but most of the characteristics still prove true. I think it is logical to believe with the information I have provided and with the explanations included, that one’s birth order does affect their characteristics whether it is strongly or slightly similar, most of these characteristics are true.

 Bibliography:

Dunkel, C., Harbke, C., & Papini, D. (2009). Direct and indirect effects of birth order on personality and identity: Support for the null hypothesis. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 170(2), 159-175. doi:10.3200/GNTP.170.2.159-175.

Herrera, N., Zajonc, R., Wieczorkowska, G., & Cichomski, B. (2003). Beliefs about birth rank and their reflection in reality. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85(1), 142-150. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.85.1.142.

Hoopes, Margaret M., Harper, James M. (1987). Birth Order Roles and Sibling Patterns in Individual and Family Therapy.  Rockville, Maryland. Aspen Publishers, Inc.

 Lamb, Michael E., Sutton-Smith, Brian. (1982). Sibling Relationships: Their Nature and Significance Across the Lifespan. Hinsdale, New Jersey. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Publishers.

Sulloway, Frank J. (1996). Born to Rebel: Birth Order, Family Dynamics and Creative Lives. New York. Random House, Inc.

Letter to Mr.Moore:

Dear Mr. Moore,

            I am writing my paper with the intent to defend the sources I used in my research paper on birth order and the characteristics one develops from their birth order. I believe that all my sources are credible sources from the three books I cited, to the two articles and the two people I interviewed.

        My first book, Born to Rebel: Birth Order, Family Dynamics and Creative Lives by Frank J. Sulloway is known to many in the world of psychology as a milestone for birth order research. This book was referenced in almost every single article I read through (which totaled about 15). Not to mention, the book has a bibliography of 76 pages. If that is not credible, I do not know what is.  My second book Birth Order Roles & Sibling Patterns in Individual & Family Therapy written by Margaret M. Hoopes and James M. Harper is also considered very credible to me. the two authors of this book both have their Ph.D’s in the field of psychology, meaning they have gone over many, many hundreds of studies in their time so they should be able to defend what they are saying in a well rounded manner. My last book, Sibling Relationships: Their Nature and Significance Across the Lifespan was written by Michael E. Lamb and Brian Sutton-Smith, both men have their Ph.D’s in psychology as well.

        One of my articles “Beliefs about birth rank and their reflection in reality” was written by four different professors, two from Stanford University, Herrera, N. and Zajonc, R. and two from a University in Poland, Wieczorkowska, G. and Cichomski, B. The information provided with the professors deemed it credible to me and after doing further research on Professor Herrera, I have found that he is now a psychology professor at DePaul. If we don’t have credible professors than how can we be such a credible university? I decided that this made him even more credible to me. Another article “Direct and indirect effects of birth order on personality and identity: Support for the null hypothesis” by 3 professors Dunkel, C., Harbke, C., and Papini, D. Again, because they are professors, I deem them credible enough to be writing and studying the subject.

        Lastly, I had two interviews, one with Callyn Humm and one with Tucker Murray. Both of these women spoke about their first hand experience with birth order in their families without any influence from my paper. I believe that they are both credible because they lived it, so how can it not be?

            As you can see Mr. Moore, I believe all my sources are credible and I believe that I gave good reasons as to why they are credible, I hope you will agree.

Sincerely,

Amanda Griffin

Add a comment May 10, 2010

Rough Draft: Research Paper

Below is the link to the survey. I’d appreciate it very much if you could take the time to answer the questions, there are only 10 of them!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BFZJNJQ

ROUGH DRAFT:

Have you ever wondered what makes you different from you to the next person? Have you ever wondered what makes you similar? I bet you have probably never tried to compare yourself with others based on birth order.  However, birth order can be very telling of someone’s personality.  Those who are only children or middle children may find themselves facing the “only child/ middle child syndrome” because of the common annoying characteristics behind being an only child or a middle child. While some people may believe that only middle children and only children face a “syndrome” this is not true; every person has a birth order that gives them unique characteristics. There are basic characteristics that follow each birth order, and the characteristics get a bit complex when going into step-, half-, or adopted siblings. I will be addressing the common characteristics that first born/only born, second born/middle born and last born children carry and why they have those characteristics.

First born children have their own stereotypes, most of which are similar to only children. First born children are characterized as children who thrive on listening to those of authority. Since these children are the first born, all they know is listening to their parents telling them to do this and not do that. Also, they are closer to their parents since they spend so much time with them and do not have to share their parent’s time with any other sibling.  First born children are described as winners. They love to be the best at everything.

Distinguishing a Second born person is a little more tough since they can be the second born in a line of eight kids or they can be second born in the line of three kids making them middle children. Second born children view their older sibling as the person to “dethrone”. They are in this constant race of catch up with their older sibling.

Last born children have characteristics that are the most individual. Last born children cannot be anything other than last born. Last born are characterized as the “wild” children. They are least likely to listen to authority and most likely to do their own thing. This is because they are so far removed from their parents grasp of discipline since they were the last born and their parents have already gone through the discipline routine a few times, they see authority as a less important aspect of their life, the very opposite of the first born child.

Add a comment May 3, 2010

Project Proposal

my research question is: How does birth order psychologically effect the first-born, the middle child, and the last born?

When given the option of doing the research paper on anything that we want, I automatically looked to the field of psychology. I love psychology and that is really what interests me. I thought to myself about questions that I had had in the past and things I continue to wonder about that I knew were researchable topics but had never taken the time to do the research on. I then realized that the topic of birth order could be a perfect research paper for me. I had always wondered how birth order affects the way siblings interact with each other and others outside the family. I had also always wondered why birth order affects people. I narrowed this down to focusing on how being the first-born, middle born and last born all affects the way one person acts and interacts with others.

My topic and question is relevent mainly to those in the field of psychology but it is also relevent to really anybody that is interested in how their birth order affects the way they act towards others and might help them realize things about themselves that they can then work with in their everyday lives. It is relevent because it helps us better understand people and how and why they do some of the things they do. If we can understand the way people act, we can better relate to them and work along with them better because we know their good areas and their weaknesses.  I think this could also be helpful not only to teachers who are dealing with many children everyday but it can also be helpful to large companies. Assuming that these characteristics we develop due to our birth order do not change when we get older, companies can use it when they want to focus on people doing group projects and place people who are compatible together.

Recchia, H., & Howe, N. (2009). Sibling relationship quality moderates the associations between parental interventions and siblings’ independent conflict strategies and outcomes. Journal of Family Psychology, 23(4), 551-561. doi:10.1037/a0014980.

The author of  Sibling Relationship Quality Moderates the Assocations Between Parental Interventions and Siblings’ Independent Conflict Strategies and Outcomes argues that sibling conflict startegies and outcomes are affected byage, birth order, relationship quality and caregivers intervention in feuds. The author shows this through research to make her point valid. The author does ths in order to show the audience how siblings interact and what if anything could be avoided if it is something negative in the sibling relationship.intended audience would be a group of social psychologists or anyone looking to further their knowledge about birth order and its psychological affects.

Herrera, N., Zajonc, R., Wieczorkowska, G., & Cichomski, B. (2003). Beliefs about birth rank and their reflection in reality. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85(1), 142-150. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.85.1.142.

.The authors are aruging that birth order affects one’s personality and how creative or intelligent one is.  The author does this by using research done 4 times over to prove his agruement. The author is trying to prove this in order to benefit child psychologist so they can better understand how siblings interact. The target audience for this article is psychologist and anyone who is interested in birth order.

Lampi, E., & Nordblom, K. (2010). Money and success—Sibling and birth-order effects on positional concerns. Journal of Economic Psychology, 31(1), 131-142. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2009.11.009.

The author is writing to argue that one’s sucess at work and earned income has to do with birth order. The author argues his point through research. The author writes this article in order to explain to a certain extent why some people are more successful at work and earn more income. the target audience for this article is psychologists and those interested in birth order.

Add a comment April 28, 2010

Research Paper Question

What are the psychological issues a person faces due to their birth order?

Add a comment April 21, 2010

Interrupted Reading

I believe Corot’s painting Interrupted Reading is about a women who is obviously reading a book, but more in depth, it is about a women trapped with no where to go. Maybe she is trapped in the house by her husband, unable to get out into public. Maybe she is trapped in her marriage, unable to escape her husbands authority over her. Maybe she is a younger woman, trapped in her parents house waiting for a man to come take her hand in marriage. Maybe she is trapped in her thoughts, unable to escape her mind. She looks like she is thinking, possibly thinking how to escape or how she got in her position she is in.

One source i found pretaining to this painting that has lead me to this conclusion talks aout Corot and his work. It discusses how he was known for his landscape paintings and known as the “father of landscape paintings”, however he kept his portrait paintings private and until his death they were not really seen by many. this idea that Corot was hiding them from the public reflects my idea of how the women in this painting is probably kept from the public, so she reads.  Another source i found does not talk specifically about Corot and his painting but refers to why men paint women reading. Men have drawn women reading as a sign of the man’s power over the woman because the men are the ones who provide reading materials to women.  Women reading threatens the men’s control over women because the women are gaining knowledge by reading.  because of this, he can stress how unhappy the woman is instead of showing how happy and free she is that she gets to read.

I trust the sources that I used because I found two of them in books and they all seemed to be well written books. Also, i dont believe a book could be published if it did not contain some factual information. Another source i used was an encylopedia, which contained information repeated over in over in many other sources so i figured that the information must be true if so many people were using it in refrence.

The Abbot Jouveau, Curate of Coubron, 1875 ,Jean Baptiste Camille Corot, Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1, Maineri to Miró: The Regenstein Collection since 1975 (2000), pp. 72-73+96

Men Reading Women Reading Interrupting Images of Women Readers, James Conlon, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 26.2 (2005) 37-58

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille (1796-1875).” The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather guide. Abington: Helicon, 2009. Credo Reference. Web. 03 April 2010. http://www.credoreference.com.ezproxy1.lib.depaul.edu/entry/heliconhe/corot_jean_baptiste_camille_1796_1875

Add a comment April 7, 2010

Precis paragrahs

1.)Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille. (2008). In The Columbia Encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://www.credoreference.com.ezproxy1.lib.depaul.edu/entry/columency/corot_jean_baptiste_camille

This article in The Columbia Encylopedia refers to Corot and suggests that his artwork was based off of the arcitecture and subjects in the towns he lived in. The writer suggests this because Corot’s artwork reflects the citys and countries  in which he lived, for example, Ville d’Avray, Italy, Switzerland, Holland and England. The writer is presenting this information in order to inform the reader on why Corot’s artwork is based so heavily off of his surroundings. The intended audience for this article is any group of people who are looking  for what Corot’s inspiration is in his paintings.

2.“Camille Corot.” Encyclopædia Britannica. 2010. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 04 Apr. 2010 <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/138362/Camille-Corot>.

The Encylopedia Britannica suggests that Corot was a notable Impressionist painter. The article shows that he was a notable impressionist by providing backround information of his life and work and including the painters that he worked under, Achille-Etna Michallon and Jean-Victor Bertin.  The article presents this information in order to shower that he was indeed a prominent painter of his time. The intended audience for this article is those who are looking to find backround information on how Corot came to be and how his paintings were influenced.

3. “Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille (1796-1875).” The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather guide. Abington: Helicon, 2009. Credo Reference. Web. 03 April 2010. http://www.credoreference.com.ezproxy1.lib.depaul.edu/entry/heliconhe/corot_jean_baptiste_camille_1796_1875

The article from the The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather guide about Corot implies that his work, while not fully supported by his parents, was that of some of the worlds greatest painters.  The article suggests this becasue it refers to his parents as giving him only a “small allowence” to study painting  when his paintings like ‘le Père Corot’ ended up becoming a huge part of 19th-century French landscape and other Impressionists in general. The target audience of this article is for anyone looking for the backround life  information on Corot and his artwork.

Add a comment April 5, 2010

It’s A Thug Life

          

( http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_wb8bAl1P-N0/S0NSiD0GIRI/AAAAAAAAL5w/SUn71YlTWj8/s400/tupac_thug_life.jpg+240%C3%97316+pixels.jpg)

Primary Source:

 Tupac Shakur’s tattoo of the phrase Thug Life raises many questions of the meaning behind it.

Secondary Source:

Thug Life is a term that originated from the Hip-Hop culture of the early 1990’s . Thug Life  came from the life on the streets, being apart of gangs and all the crime that came with it. Tupac Shakur made it famous naming his rap group Thug Life. He used the term a lot in refrence to his life.  (http://www.bostontheological.org/assets/files/12kjohnson.pdf)

Tertiary source:

the definition of thug life, according to onlineslangdictionary.com, is the philosophy of taking tremendous risks in terms of lifestyle, with the concept of making a plethora of money and dying young.(http://onlineslangdictionary.com/definition+of/thug+life)

Add a comment March 31, 2010

Pages

Categories

Links

Meta

Calendar

October 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Most Recent Posts